All posts in “Photography”

China Dialogues, November 12 – December 12, 2015

In collaboration with the Museum of Contemporary Art Beijing, Bennington College hosted the China Dialogues (November 2-December 2), an exploratory project in providing a supportive platform for artists to showcase creativity while promoting cross-cultural conversations.  It featured open rehearsals within an installation created by professor Yangen in collaboration with Dai Jian.  Read more about the exhibition here.

Penelope Umbrico: Campus Surplus, September 8 – October 24, 2015

Penelope Umbrico’s Campus Surplus explored the connections between the Modern school and office: the rationalized spaces, tools, and systems that promise efficiency and productivity. The exhibition included photographs of used copiers, desks, cubicles, and plants collected from liquidation websites, as well as images she has taken in the surplus rooms of college campuses around the country, video projections of a custom-made tile game, materials related to learning products, and a site specific installation drawn from Bennington’s own Buildings and Grounds.  Read more about the exhibition here.

IF NOT NOW WHEN, Senior Show 2015

2015 Senior Exhibition 

Featuring work by Nina Berinstein, Molly Brown, Nicolas Burrier, Dania Clarke, Nicholas DiLeonardi, Elizabeth Edwards, Andrew Emard , Wesley Evans, Elizabeth Gombert, Glennis Henderson, Sophie Hesselgrave, Sierra Rivers Hollister, Robin Hopkinson, Madeline Johnson, Maren Johnson, Jay Kineke, Jeffrey Kitchen, Kione Kochi, Carolyn Lewon, Shannon Mahoney, Lieb Mathieson, Ruby McCollister, Mollie McElvain, Brianna Morel, Madeleine Morris, Evangeline Neuhart, Michelle Nguyen, Zenji Oguri, Lily Olin, Heather Rodgers, Sara Salaway, Morgana Tetherow-Keller, and Rebecca White.

Meat, Chapter 3: The Maggots Will Find You, April 21 – May 12, 2015

This exhibition followed Price’s Meat series, inspired by a violent incident in Nicaragua in 1985 when Price was shot with a high-powered rifle in his left abdomen. This traumatic experience symbolically killed the trauma of Price’s childhood. The ghosts of his traumatic childhood, the death of his mother and sister in the late 90s, and the remnants of his gunshot wound are recurring examinations in Luther’s body and his body of work. This exhibition featured a brand-new series of handmade 35mm slides, the second ever exhibition of Price’s little-seen sculpture work from the mid-to-late 1980s, and a series of 40 photographs from the late 80s by photographer Russell Scholl.  A mini-retrospective of Luther Price’s moving-image works accompanied the Usdan Exhibition.  Read more about the exhibition here.

Ungoverned Spaces, October 28 – December 16, 2014

A collaborative presentation assembled by artist Gregory Thielker and anthropologist Noah Coburn, (Un)governed spaces focused on the Afghan region surrounding the U.S. military base at Bagram. The region—which has been occupied by Alexander the Great, the Soviet Union, the Taliban, and most recently, the United States—offers a crossroads of past and present. Over the course of the past three years, Thielker and Coburn lived, researched, and toured the region, sharing intimate conversations with locals, interviewing U.S. soldiers, sketching the bazaar and local houses, and conducting historical and ethnographic research both in Afghanistan and the United States. Read more about the exhibition here.

Tom Brennan – Collecting Shadows, Feb/March 2014

Brennan_Announcement_v

 

Describing this show, the artist wrote:

“Here are photographs made without a camera, an approach that dates to the early 19th century when Fox-Talbot used the term photogenic drawing to describe his documents of objects from nature. Camera-less photography since Fox-Talbot has moved away from the document; this work, on the other hand, is documentary.
Here are examples of personal collecting and examples of social collecting, with the two types being different experiences of the natural world. It is History that differentiates between the social and the personal. Working with museum collections demands attention to taxonomy – naming the world – which leads to considerations of symbolic representation.
How does symbolic thinking affect the intention to create a document? Shadows are both the most perfect and the least perfect records.
Vantage point as it influences representation is a concern in Art as well as in Physics.
The 18th century term for scientific instruments was philosophical apparatus.
The advantage of imposed limitations is that those limitations allow you to work.”